Croydon Food Swap

Promotes and encourages sustainable gardening

Fermented tea, anyone?

3 Comments

Raw and fermented food and beverage is the trend now so I might as well hitch a ride 🙂  Actually, one of the swappers has requested me to write about this as she has excess to share but can’t describe/explain what they are.  So here I am writing from what I can find online, and not from personal experience.  Would love to hear your personal experiences which will be invaluable, especially to those thinking of trying or just starting to brew!

Firstly, what is Kombucha?  It is a sweet tea fermented with the Kombucha culture, resulting in a fizzy drink with live cultures / probiotics.  It should not be confused with Konbucha which refers to a different drink made from edible kelp.

The Kombucha culture is also referred to as the SCOBY which stands for a Symbiotic Culture Of Bacteria and Yeast.  The SCOBY, sometimes called the mother, looks like a large, flat mushroom but I also think it looks a little like the Portuguese Man O’ War jellyfish, floating on top of the tea.

To make the drink, place the SCOBY in a sweetened black or green tea.  Leave for 7-10 days.  After 7 days, taste to test for the balance of sweetness and tartness according to your taste.  Remove the SCOBY for the next batch and bottle the drink.  You may flavour with juice, herbs or fruit.  If you like it fizzier, let the bottled drink ferment for another 1-3 days (secondary fermentation).  Then refrigerate to stop the fermentation process.  Do note that the drink carbonates so make sure you use bottles that will not explode!

You will be able to find a lot of information online on brewing the drink and caring for the SCOBY, etc.  Experiment to see what works best for you.

If you would like to get a SCOBY or 2, please post a request on our FB page and hopefully someone’s SCOBY has been growing happily and is looking for a new family 🙂  Yes, SCOBYs can be swapped too!

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3 thoughts on “Fermented tea, anyone?

  1. We love Kombucha. The “worst” part is the mother does multiply. We’ve taken to drying the excess for crafting because there is so much.

    • Wonder if you can eat the excess ‘mother’? Just a thought!

      • We did make a sort of gummy candy out of it once – instructions are in The Art of Fermentation. It was a lot of work and my family didn’t love it. If you ever get a chance to read that book, he has a whole section on what to do with extra mothers. One designer makes jackets out of it which is what gave us the idea to dry it for crafting.